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What to take for dental pain?

Toothache is not always related to an underlying condition. It may be caused by:

  • Injury or trauma to the tooth
  • Damaged or fractured tooth
  • Dental work: After getting a filling or crown
  • Braces
  • Teeth clenching or grinding
  • Repetitive motions (chewing or grinding)
  • Third molars (“wisdom teeth”)
  • Biting into a hard object
  • Cavity
  • Tooth decay
  • Exposed root surfaces

Related ConditionsRelated ConditionsSometimes toothache may signify an underlying health condition. These conditions include:

Common

A bacterial infection causing collection of pus at the root of a tooth.

Symptoms may include:

  • Toothache
  • Bad breath
  • A foul taste in the mouth

Common

A bacterial infection which causes inflammation of gums around the base of teeth.

Symptoms may include:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Loose teeth
  • Toothache

Very common

A condition in which the sinuses are inflamed for over 12 weeks causing difficulty in breathing due to nasal blockage.

Symptoms may include:

  • Swelling and tenderness around the eyes and nose
  • Mucus discharge from the nose
  • Toothache

Very common

A serious gum infection that damages the soft tissue and bone supporting the tooth.

Symptoms may include:

  • Red and swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Toothache

What are the treatment options?What specialists to consult?When to see a doctor?

For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica.

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  • People also askWhen you should seek dental care for tooth pain?When you should seek dental care for tooth pain?Here are a few signs that you should seek emergency dental care right away. Small tooth chips or cracks can usually wait until regular office hours for treatment, but large breaks and fractures to a tooth accompanied by significant pain require immediate attention from a local emergency dentist.

    Common Causes

    Toothache is not always related to an underlying condition. It may be caused by:

    • Injury or trauma to the tooth
    • Damaged or fractured tooth
    • Dental work: After getting a filling or crown
    • Braces
    • Teeth clenching or grinding
    • Repetitive motions (chewing or grinding)
    • Third molars (“wisdom teeth”)
    • Biting into a hard object
    • Cavity
    • Tooth decay
    • Exposed root surfaces

    Related ConditionsRelated Conditions Sometimes toothache may signify an underlying health condition. These conditions include:

    Common

    A bacterial infection causing collection of pus at the root of a tooth.

    Symptoms may include:

    • Toothache
    • Bad breath
    • A foul taste in the mouth

    Common

    A bacterial infection which causes inflammation of gums around the base of teeth.

    Symptoms may include:

    • Gums that bleed easily
    • Loose teeth
    • Toothache

    Very common

    A condition in which the sinuses are inflamed for over 12 weeks causing difficulty in breathing due to nasal blockage.

    Symptoms may include:

    • Swelling and tenderness around the eyes and nose
    • Mucus discharge from the nose
    • Toothache

    Very common

    A serious gum infection that damages the soft tissue and bone supporting the tooth.

    Symptoms may include:

    • Red and swollen gums
    • Tender or bleeding gums
    • Toothache

    What are the treatment options?What specialists to consult?When to see a doctor?

    For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

    Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica.

    Was this helpful?When you should seek dental care for tooth pain? Here are a few signs that you should seek emergency dental care right away. Small tooth chips or cracks can usually wait until regular office hours for treatment, but large breaks and fractures to a tooth accompanied by significant pain require immediate attention from a local emergency dentist.

    What medications cause tooth pain? There are some medications, such as the antibiotics tetracycline, that may result in internal staining of the teeth. Depending on the age of the user, other drugs can also cause staining. These drugs include antihistamines, antidepressants, and oral contraceptives.

    How often can I take Tylenol for tooth pain? yes, you can take acetamenophen or Tylenol for tooth pain, every 4-6 hours of 500mg-650mg. the max dose daily is between 3000-4000mg total max dose in a 24 hour period.

    When do I need to go to the dentist about my tooth pain? It is important to see your dentist if pain is consistent and does not go away in a day or two. Dull pain that is persistent can often be a sign of something that will get worse if not treated. If you notice that a tooth is chipped, cracked, or broken, you should see a dentist as soon as possible.

    When to call the dentist for a toothache?

    When to call the dentist for a toothache? A toothache should be taken seriously, but may not require emergency dental care. It can be the first sign of a bigger issue and could lead to more serious dental problems if not cared for. You should call your dentist anytime you have a toothache.

    When to go to the dentist for an emergency? Not all dental problems require you to seek emergency dental care. In cases where one or more teeth have been completely knocked out, your mouth has been injured, or a tooth abscess is leading to a lot of pain, you may need to be seen immediately. Serious dental injuries or problems can lead to even worse problems if not cared for immediately.

    When to go to the dentist for a tooth break? Small tooth chips or cracks can usually wait until regular office hours for treatment, but large breaks and fractures to a tooth accompanied by significant pain require immediate attention from a local emergency dentist. A severe break often suggests that damage has occurred to the outside of the tooth and the inner tissue.

    What can you do in the emergency room for a tooth fracture? Dental Treatment in the Emergency Room. The ER staff can get patients stabilized, control bleeding and give treatment for dental fractures. In the case of bacterial infections, they can provide antibiotics and will arrange for transfer to hospital if necessary.