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What medications do you take for kidney disease?

These include:

  • Advil and Motrin (generic and store-brand ibuprofen). Ibuprofen is also in other over-the-counter drugs, such as cold medicines.
  • Aleve (generic and store-brand naproxen).
  • Celebrex (generic celecoxib).

What medicines are bad for your kidneys? Penicillin, cephalosporins and sulfonamides in particular can be harmful to your kidneys. Long-term antibiotic use can injure your kidneys, even if you’re otherwise healthy. And for people whose kidneys aren’t functioning at 100 percent to begin with, antibiotics can build up in the body and cause damage.

Which medications should you avoid if you have kidney disease? This is especially important if you have been diagnosed with CKD Chronic Kidney Disease A condition characterized by a gradual loss of kidney function. . High-dose statins that should be avoided by patients with Kidney Disease include Crestor (10 milligrams or higher), Lipitor (20 milligrams or higher), and Zocor (40 milligrams or higher).

What is the best medicine for kidney? Ginger has been used to treat various ailments, including as herbal medicine for kidneys for more than 2000 years. And recent research has established that ginger has antioxidant properties that help to protect kidneys and dissolve kidney stones.

What medications improve kidney function? Take mediation: There are many medications available both over the counter and on prescription that aim to improve kidney function. These include ACE inhibitors that slow down kidney disease, and diuretics which help the body to clear out excess fluid.

Pain medications

Pain medications

Pain medications. If you have decreased kidney function some over-the-counter and prescription pain medications, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are not recommended because they can reduce blood flow to the kidneys.

kidney.org

Pain Medications. Your kidneys could be damaged if you take large amounts of over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen. None of these medicines should be taken daily or regularly without first talking to your healthcare provider.

kidney.orgCholesterol medicationsCholesterol medications

Cholesterol medications. The dosing of certain cholesterol medications, known as “statins”, may need to be adjusted if you have chronic kidney disease.

Anti-microbial meds

Anti-microbial meds. Many anti-fungal, antibiotic and antiviral medications are cleared by the kidneys. It’s important that you and your clinician are aware of your level of kidney function so that a kidney-safe medication can be prescribed for your treatment.

Diabetes medications

Diabetes medications. Insulin and certain medications used by people with diabetes are cleared by the kidneys. Because diabetes is a leading cause of kidney disease, it’s important that those with diabetes control their blood sugar levels.

Upset stomach/antacid medications

Upset stomach/antacid medications. This group of over-the-counter medications can disrupt the body’s electrolyte balance if you have chronic kidney disease.

What medications damage the kidneys? 1) NSAIDS. NSAIDS, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve), lead the list for drugs that cause kidney damage because of their widespread use.

What medications improve kidney function? Take mediation: There are many medications available both over the counter and on prescription that aim to improve kidney function. These include ACE inhibitors that slow down kidney disease, and diuretics which help the body to clear out excess fluid.

What medications are toxic to kidney? Most drugs that cause damage within the kidneys do so as a result of hypersensitivity reactions, which involve either glomerular or interstitial damage. Drugs that have been reported to cause glomerulonephritis include penicillamine, gold, captopril, phenytoin and some antibiotics, including penicillins,…

How does Benadryl affect your kidneys? Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is not known to cause problems with the kidneys. Metabolism occurs in the liver but it (and its metabolites) are excreted renally. Nevertheless, if you have decreased kidney function, there is no need to adjust your dose.