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What is one example of misinterpreting an abbreviation?

For example, the abbreviation “D/C,” seen in innumerable patient medical charts, should not be used. According to ISMP, “D/C” is sometimes intended to mean “discharge,” and other times, to mean, “discontinue.”

Do You Put abbreviations on your do not use list? The Joint Commission (TJC) has established a National Patient Safety Goal that specifies that certain abbreviations must appear on an accredited organization’s do-not-use list; we have highlighted these items with a double asterisk (**). However, we hope that you will consider others beyond the minimum TJC requirements.

Which is the best example of a mistranslation? Sometimes mistranslations can cause more than just embarrassment, but have a permanent impact on the very culture of a nation. Back in the 1950s, chocolate companies began encouraging couples in Japan to start celebrating Valentine’s Day, but a mistranslation from one company made it seem like the idea was for women to give chocolates to men!

Which is the best blog for translation and interpreting? TranslatorThoughts is a blog about Translation, Interpreting, Languages and Freelancing. Featuring articles from a variety of authors, interviews, tips and much more. If you want to contribute, write an email at [email protected]

Do you have to use acronyms in a list?

Do you have to use acronyms in a list? If you use a lot of acronyms in the document, you can also introduce them in a list of abbreviations. There are some extremely common acronyms that do not need to be introduced. However, the list is small. Some examples of acronyms that don’t need to be spelled out include:

Are there any acronyms that do not need to be spelled out? There are some extremely common acronyms that do not need to be introduced. However, the list is small. Some examples of acronyms that don’t need to be spelled out include: What can proofreading do for your paper?

When did the official do not use list come out? In an effort to reduce confusion, in 2004 the Joint Commission (a private, non-profit organization that accredits healthcare organizations in the United States) released its Official Do Not Use List of abbreviations that accredited organizations are not allowed to use. Pictured below is the Official Do Not Use List, as it stands today:

Is it safe to use abbreviations in a table? While the abbreviations, symbols, and dose designations in the Table should NEVER be used, not allowing the use of ANY abbreviations is exceedingly unlikely. Therefore, the person who uses an organization-approved abbreviation must take responsibility for making sure that it is properly interpreted.