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What is intermittent claudication?

People with mild to moderate claudication are advised to keep walking, stop smoking, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Other treatments include antiplatelet therapy, pentoxifylline or cilostazol, angioplasty (inserting a balloon into the artery to open it up), and bypass surgery.

What is the treatment for claudication? People with mild to moderate claudication are advised to keep walking, stop smoking, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Other treatments include antiplatelet therapy, pentoxifylline or cilostazol, angioplasty (inserting a balloon into the artery to open it up), and bypass surgery.

What is claudication, and are you at risk? Claudication is generally considered a warning of significant atherosclerosis in the circulatory system, indicating an increased risk of heart attack or stroke. Additional complications of peripheral artery disease due to atherosclerosis include:

What does claudication feel like? Claudication is pain and/or cramping in the lower leg due to inadequate blood flow to the muscles. The pain usually causes the person to limp. The word “claudication” comes from the Latin “claudicare” meaning to limp. Claudication typically is felt while walking, and subsides with rest.

Can claudication be reversed? The temporary pain you’re feeling is caused by impeded blood flow, also known as intermittent claudication. The pain indicates that not enough blood is getting through the veins in your arms or legs because they have been blocked, probably by large deposits of plaque. It can be serious, but luckily, it can also be reversed.

Medication

Medication

Antiplatelet agents: Prevent blood clot formation.

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Hemorrheologic agents: Decreases the viscosity (stickiness) of blood.

Statins: To lower cholesterol.

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Vasodilators: Improve blood flow and reduce muscle pain/cramps.

ProceduresProcedures

This helps widen the blocked artery.

A thin medicated metal mesh is placed in the artery to prevent it from narrowing.

A healthy blood vessel from another part of the body is used to replace the one causing claudication.

NutritionNutrition

Foods to eat:

  • Fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids
  • Increase the intake of food with calcium (cheese, broccoli, kale, and sardine) and fiber
  • Foods containing Omega 3 fatty acids (walnut, fish, flaxseed, chia seeds)

Foods to avoid:

  • NA

Specialist to consult Specializes in the diseases of the vascular system and performs minimally-invasive catheter procedures, surgical reconstruction.Specializes in the acute and chronic illnesses and provides preventive care and health.What are the causes?What are some prevention tips?How is this diagnosed?For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica. Was this helpful?Can claudication be reversed? The temporary pain you’re feeling is caused by impeded blood flow, also known as intermittent claudication. The pain indicates that not enough blood is getting through the veins in your arms or legs because they have been blocked, probably by large deposits of plaque. It can be serious, but luckily, it can also be reversed.

What does claudication feel like? Claudication is pain and/or cramping in the lower leg due to inadequate blood flow to the muscles. The pain usually causes the person to limp. The word “claudication” comes from the Latin “claudicare” meaning to limp. Claudication typically is felt while walking, and subsides with rest.

What is intermittent claudication symptoms? Intermittent claudication. Intermittent claudication (Latin: claudicatio intermittens), is a symptom that describes muscle pain on mild exertion (ache, cramp, numbness or sense of fatigue), classically in the calf muscle, which occurs during exercise, such as walking, and is relieved by a short period of rest.