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What is communal pneumonia?

An infection caused by bacteria or virus. Fungi or mycoplasma can rarely be the cause. Fungal pneumonia is not infectious.

  • Bacterial and viral pneumonia spread through inhalation of airborne droplets by coughing or sneezing

Risk factors include:

  • Age – the most vulnerable are children below 2 years and adults above 65 years
  • Hospitalized in intensive care unit and if on support of ventilator for a prolonged period
  • Lung diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can increase the risk
  • Smoking
  • Poor immune system – persons with weak immune system due to conditions such as HIV/AIDS, Cancer or undergone organ transplants

ComplicationsComplications

Pneumonia is usually treatable with antibiotics (if bacterial). If it is untreated it can lead to serious complications, such as:

  • Bacteremia: infection that spreads to the bloodstream
  • Lung abscesses: Pus formation in the lung cavities
  • Impaired breathing: trouble getting enough oxygen; ventilator may be required
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome: severe form of respiratory infection
  • Pleural effusion: fluid build-up in tissue that lines the lungs

What are the treatment options?What diet is recommended?How is this diagnosed?For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica. Was this helpful?

  • People also askWhat causes community acquired pneumonia?What causes community acquired pneumonia?Amongst the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia are bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common bacteria, and Haemophilus influenzae. However, viruses, including influenza viruses, can also cause community-acquired pneumonia.

    Symptoms

    Symptoms may include:

    • Cough with mucus or phlegm
    • Fever usually of high grade with chills
    • Fast breathing
    • Shortness of breath
    • Chest pain while coughing
    • Fast heartbeat
    • Feeling very tired or very weak
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Diarrhea
    • Loss of appetite
    • Body pain
    • Severely affected patients my cough up blood or show cyanosis (have a blue color around the mouth due to lack of oxygen)

    CausesCauses

    An infection caused by bacteria or virus. Fungi or mycoplasma can rarely be the cause. Fungal pneumonia is not infectious.

    • Bacterial and viral pneumonia spread through inhalation of airborne droplets by coughing or sneezing

    Risk factors include:

    • Age – the most vulnerable are children below 2 years and adults above 65 years
    • Hospitalized in intensive care unit and if on support of ventilator for a prolonged period
    • Lung diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can increase the risk
    • Smoking
    • Poor immune system – persons with weak immune system due to conditions such as HIV/AIDS, Cancer or undergone organ transplants

    ComplicationsComplications

    Pneumonia is usually treatable with antibiotics (if bacterial). If it is untreated it can lead to serious complications, such as:

    • Bacteremia: infection that spreads to the bloodstream
    • Lung abscesses: Pus formation in the lung cavities
    • Impaired breathing: trouble getting enough oxygen; ventilator may be required
    • Acute respiratory distress syndrome: severe form of respiratory infection
    • Pleural effusion: fluid build-up in tissue that lines the lungs

    What are the treatment options?What diet is recommended?How is this diagnosed?For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica. Was this helpful?What causes community acquired pneumonia? Amongst the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia are bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common bacteria, and Haemophilus influenzae. However, viruses, including influenza viruses, can also cause community-acquired pneumonia.

    What is the definition of community acquired pneumonia? Community-Acquired Pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is defined as an acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma in a patient who has acquired the infection in the community and has not had recent hospitalization or association with other healthcare facilities such as nursing homes, dialysis centers, and outpatient clinics.

    What is community based pneumonia? Community-acquired pneumonia refers to pneumonia (any of several lung diseases) contracted by a person with little contact with the healthcare system. The chief difference between hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and CAP is that patients with HAP live in long-term care facilities or have recently visited a hospital.

    What is the most common cause of pneumonia? Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of people each year in the United States. Germs called bacteria, viruses, and fungi may cause pneumonia. In adults, bacteria are the most common cause of pneumonia. Bacteria and viruses living in your nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread to your lungs.

    What is the difference between hospital and community acquired pneumonia?

    What is the difference between hospital and community acquired pneumonia? Community-acquired pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia refers to pneumonia (any of several lung diseases) contracted by a person with little contact with the healthcare system. The chief difference between hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and CAP is that patients with HAP live in long-term care facilities or have recently visited a hospital.

    What is the most common cause of pneumonia? Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of people each year in the United States. Germs called bacteria, viruses, and fungi may cause pneumonia. In adults, bacteria are the most common cause of pneumonia. Bacteria and viruses living in your nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread to your lungs.

    Is community acquired PNA contagious? Community-acquired pneumonia is the most common and also the most contagious pneumonia class. Community-acquired pneumonia is usually spread as a result of existence of the microbes in the environment, plus company of any person infected with this disease often tends to lead to pneumonia.

    What is the most common injury of pneumonia? Severe pneumonia. Severe cases of pneumonia usually affect all five lobes of the lungs. Head, chest or other major injury. Accidents, such as falls or car crashes, can directly damage the lungs or the portion of the brain that controls breathing.