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What does antimuscarinic mean?

antimuscarinic (anticholinergic) (anti-musk-er-in-ik) adj. inhibiting the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the parasympathetic nervous system. Antimuscarinic drugs relax smooth muscle, decrease the secretion of saliva, sweat, and digestive juice, and dilate the pupil of the eye.

What kind of drug is an antimuscarinic? In this paper anticholinergic drug treatment is considered and, specifically, antimuscarinic drugs. Although antimuscarinic drugs are a type of anticholinergic agent their antagonist action is specific to the muscarinic receptors.

How are antimuscarinic drugs different from cholinergic drugs? Although antimuscarinic drugs are a type of anticholinergic agent their antagonist action is specific to the muscarinic receptors. Anticholinergic or cholinergic-blocking drugs also incorporate anticholinesterase drugs and drugs used to treat motion sickness, cardiac arrhythmias, parkinsonism, chronic asthma and pupil dilatation agents.

What are the side effects of antimuscarinics in humans? Adverse effects resulting from the impaired secretion by exocrine glands are often a dry mouth and sore throat. Antimuscarinics can also cause tachycardia, or a higher than usual heart rate, when interfering with receptors that typically slow the heart rate.

How are antimuscarinics used in the central nervous system? Some antimuscarinic medications are lipophilic and can therefore cross the blood brain barrier, such as atropine and benztropine. When these medications pass through to the brain, they are able to target the central nervous system and influence certain neurological functions.

What are the different types of antimuscarinic drugs?

What are the different types of antimuscarinic drugs? There are two classes of mydriatics: (1) antimuscarinic (parasympatholytic, anticholinergic, atropine-like) drugs which antagonize the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors in the ciliary muscle, such as atropine, cyclopentolate, homatropine, hyoscine (scopolamine) and tropicamide. Antimuscarinic drugs produce cycloplegia as well.

How are antimuscarinic drugs different from cholinergic drugs? Although antimuscarinic drugs are a type of anticholinergic agent their antagonist action is specific to the muscarinic receptors. Anticholinergic or cholinergic-blocking drugs also incorporate anticholinesterase drugs and drugs used to treat motion sickness, cardiac arrhythmias, parkinsonism, chronic asthma and pupil dilatation agents.

How are antimuscarinic drugs work on the nervous system? Antimuscarinic drugs interrupt parasympathetic nerve impulses by competing with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at muscarinic receptor sites (Williams et al, 1998).

Which is an anticholinergic agent that blocks the muscarinic receptor? A muscarinic receptor antagonist (MRA) is a type of anticholinergic agent that blocks the activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.