Daily

What do you take suboxone for?

May Treat: ·

Drug Class: Agents for Opioid Withdrawal, Opioid-Type

Availability: Prescription sometimes needed

Pregnancy: Consult a doctor before using

Lactation: Consult a doctor before using

May Treat: ·

Drug Class: Agents for Opioid Withdrawal, Opioid-Type

Availability: Prescription sometimes needed

Pregnancy: Consult a doctor before using

Lactation: Consult a doctor before using

Alcohol: Avoid intake while taking this medication

Driving: May cause drowsiness or dizziness. Use caution

Manufacturer: INDIVIOR INC.

PrecautionsPrecautions

  • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
  • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
  • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
  • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
  • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
  • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
  • Avoid alcohol/other drugs that make you sleepy
  • Taking a larger dose may cause breathing problems.
  • MD may need to reduce the dose before you stop it.
  • Review all drugs you are taking with your doctor
  • Do not swallow whole or chew

  • For film, medicated products : Dissolve under tongue or between cheek and gum. Dry hands before using.
  • For tablet, sublingual products : Dissolve under tongue.

What are side effects of Suboxone?Any warnings while using Suboxone?Does Suboxone interact with any drugs?Is Suboxone contraindicated for any condition?How to use Suboxone?What if you missed a dose of Suboxone?

For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: First Databank

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  • People also askWhat all is Suboxone used for?What all is Suboxone used for?A: Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone that is used to treat opiate addiction. Buprenorphine is an opioid medication, similar to other opioids such as morphine, codeine, and heroin. However, it produces less euphoric (high) effects and therefore may be easier to stop taking.

    Precautions

    • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
    • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
    • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
    • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
    • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
    • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
    • Avoid alcohol/other drugs that make you sleepy
    • Taking a larger dose may cause breathing problems.
    • MD may need to reduce the dose before you stop it.
    • Review all drugs you are taking with your doctor
    • Do not swallow whole or chew

    • For film, medicated products : Dissolve under tongue or between cheek and gum. Dry hands before using.
    • For tablet, sublingual products : Dissolve under tongue.

    What are side effects of Suboxone?Any warnings while using Suboxone?Does Suboxone interact with any drugs?Is Suboxone contraindicated for any condition?How to use Suboxone?What if you missed a dose of Suboxone?

    For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

    Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: First Databank

    Was this helpful?What all is Suboxone used for? A: Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone that is used to treat opiate addiction. Buprenorphine is an opioid medication, similar to other opioids such as morphine, codeine, and heroin. However, it produces less euphoric (high) effects and therefore may be easier to stop taking.

    What is an over-the-counter substitute for Suboxone? Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) – This refers to Suboxone withdrawal remedies such as Advil, Aleeve , and Tylenol , which are over-the-counter pain relievers. They can be used to help ease aching muscles and limbs.

    What happens when you take opiates on Suboxone? Suboxone binds more strongly to the receptors than opiates do: if the patient still has opiates in their system and takes suboxone, the suboxone will displace the opiates and induce a rapid and massive withdrawal. Should the patient take opiates while on suboxone, the opiates will likely have minimal to no effect.

    Do drug rehabs use Suboxone? Suboxone (naloxone and buprenorphine) is a Schedule II controlled substance that can be prescribed only by approved physicians. Some rehabs may use Suboxone for withdrawal management from opioids and the treatment of pain if they have a qualified physician on staff.

    Precautions

    Precautions

    • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
    • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
    • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
    • Before use, important to read the Medication Guide
    • Discuss risks/benefits if woman of childbearing age
    • May make you drowsy or dizzy. Drive with caution
    • Avoid alcohol/other drugs that make you sleepy
    • Taking a larger dose may cause breathing problems.
    • MD may need to reduce the dose before you stop it.
    • Review all drugs you are taking with your doctor
    • Do not swallow whole or chew

    • For film, medicated products : Dissolve under tongue or between cheek and gum. Dry hands before using.
    • For tablet, sublingual products : Dissolve under tongue.

    What are side effects of Suboxone?Any warnings while using Suboxone?Does Suboxone interact with any drugs?Is Suboxone contraindicated for any condition?How to use Suboxone?What if you missed a dose of Suboxone?

    For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.

    Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: First Databank

    Was this helpful?What is a good substitute for Suboxone? St. John’s Wort. This herbal supplement is a great alternative to Suboxone. St. John’s Wort contains natural amounts of a chemical called Hyperforin, which in fact reacts in your body in much the same way as Suboxone does, blocking the receptors that cause addiction in the first place.

    What’s the difference between Suboxone and Zubsolv? The primary difference between Zubsolv and Suboxone is the bioavailability of each drug. Zubsolv is regarded as having a significantly greater bioavailability than Suboxone. This means that when you take Zubsolv, the percentage of the drug that has an active effect is greater than that of Suboxone.

    What happens when you take opiates on Suboxone? Suboxone binds more strongly to the receptors than opiates do: if the patient still has opiates in their system and takes suboxone, the suboxone will displace the opiates and induce a rapid and massive withdrawal. Should the patient take opiates while on suboxone, the opiates will likely have minimal to no effect.

    How bad is Suboxone for You? No, Suboxone is not bad for you. It is a lifesaving medication that is safe, highly effective, and well tolerated. It is well known now that there is an opiate epidemic in the US with more lives lost each day to opiate overdose than motor vehicle accidents.