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What are the odds of beating leukemia?

What are the odds of beating leukemia? Today, the average five-year survival rate for all types of leukemia is 65.8%. That means about 69 of every 100 people with leukemia are likely to live at least five years after diagnosis. Many people will live much longer than five years.

What are the risks of leukemia? Specific risk factors for leukemia include: Exposure to cancer-causing agents. Smoking. History of radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Myelodysplastic syndromes. Rare genetic syndromes. Family history.

What is the average age of leukemia? Average age of diagnosis is 68. CLL, which is rare in children, is the most diagnosed leukemia type in adults. Average age of diagnosis is 70. CML, also rare in children, accounts for about 15 percent of all leukemias.

What is the prognosis for blood cancer? Statistics for blood cancer should be updated on regular basis as factors like blood cancer prognosis and survival rate keep changing from time to time. Among lymphoma, for Non – Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the survival for one year is estimated at 80% and for five years it stands at 67%.

How does smoking cause leukemia? Severe Malnutrition – nutrients are not available for proper bone marrow functioning. Smoking and Second hand smoke – Tobacco smoke contains benzene and five other chemicals known as to cause cancer. Smoking increases your risk of getting leukemia by 30% and is the main cause in 14% of all adult leukemia cases.

Symptoms

Symptoms

Leukemia symptoms vary, depending on the type of leukemia. Common signs and symptoms of leukemia include:

  • Swollen lymph nodes especially in the neck and armpits
  • Experience pain in bones
  • Night sweats – excessive sweating, especially at Night
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Rapid weight loss
  • Red spots on the skin
  • Bleeding and bruising easily
  • Fever or chills
  • Frequent infections

CausesCauses

  • The exact cause is not known. Hereditary and environmental factors may play a role in developing the disease.
  • The risk factors include:
  • Mutations in the DNA are frequently a major cause.
  • Sometimes chromosome translocation can also promote activation of oncogenes (the cancer inducing genes) and this can lead to disease progression.
  • Exposure to certain chemicals and radiation can also induce cancer.

PreventionPrevention

In most cases it is difficult to identify a specific viral cause which makes prevention difficult.

ComplicationsComplications

Complications include:

  • Weight Loss
  • Anemia
  • Tumor lysis syndrome
  • Transformation of chronic lymphoma to aggressive one called Richter transformation.
  • Chances of developing autoimmune disorders.
  • Development of secondary cancer.
  • Infertility
  • Slow growth
  • Damage of central nervous system.
  • Cataract
  • Side effects of chemotherapy drugs.

What are the treatment options?What diet is recommended?How is this diagnosed?For informational purposes only. Consult a medical professional for advice.Reviewed by a panel of doctors. Source: Focus Medica. Was this helpful?What are the odds of getting leukemia? While the median age of diagnosis is 64, the disease strikes children as well as the elderly and may occur at any age in between. The lifetime risk of developing leukemia is 1.3%, or one in 78 people. Be aware that “leukemia” isn’t one disease.

What can cause leukemia? Leukemia can be caused by many factors, including heredity (genetics), radiation chemical substances such as radioactive and hazardous substances clams, and also because of the virus. Leukemia patients should immediately consult a doctor to quickly get treatment and intense therapy.

How does smoking cause leukemia? Severe Malnutrition – nutrients are not available for proper bone marrow functioning. Smoking and Second hand smoke – Tobacco smoke contains benzene and five other chemicals known as to cause cancer. Smoking increases your risk of getting leukemia by 30% and is the main cause in 14% of all adult leukemia cases.

Can adult leukemia be cured? Adults are more likely to suffer from chronic forms of leukemia. Some leukemia patients can be cured, but in other situations the disease can only be controlled. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplants.