How much are ear wax candles?

Ear wax candles, also known as ear coning or thermal-auricular therapy, is a practice where a hollow candle is inserted into the ear canal and lit. The heat produced by the burning candle creates a suction force that supposedly draws out impurities and excess wax from the ear. But how much are these candles really worth? Let’s dive deep into this questionable yet intriguing topic.

What Exactly are Ear Wax Candles?

Before we discuss prices, let’s talk about what exactly an ear wax candle is. These cone-shaped candles usually come in pairs and are made of fabric soaked in beeswax, paraffin wax or soy wax that has been coated with powdered herbs such as chamomile, eucalyptus or lavender.

To use them, you insert one end of the cone-shaped candle into your ear canal which then stick out at the other end like a wick. You light it up on fire and wait for it to burn down till around 4 inches long.

Some people believe that they help reduce symptoms associated with headaches, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), vertigo , sinus problems etc but there is no scientific evidence to prove this yet.

Nevertheless, many people still swear by their effectiveness despite some medical research calling them ineffective if not harmful [1].

So just How Much Do They Cost?

Now comes to everyone’s favourite part- price! Depending on where you purchase from supplier charging more than others – perhaps due to variations such quality ingredients used – however, typically speaking most types range between $5-$15 per pair ($2.50-$7.50 each).

If you opt for natural ingredients instead of synthetic ones Prices may be higher since organic herbs tend cost anywhere from 3$ – $25 ounce depending on selection & source [2].

Bear in mind well-made authentic high-quality varieties could produce even pricier results; it is possible pay up to $25 each ($50 pair). Generally speaking, the price can fluctuate depending on quality and sourcing.

Are They Safe?

The safest way to use these candles are under supervision. Remember that there no scientific proof supporting the effectiveness of ear wax cones in removing earwax safely, so you do this entirely at your own risk.
Furthermore, many cases of ‘ear candling’ resulting in injuries attempting poorly [3]. This includes burns from hot wax dripping onto skin or contact with flames, but also serious inner-ear problems when candle flame was extinguished within 4 cm (about 1&frac12 inches) of eardrum.
Many otolaryngologists (commonly known as ENTs ) strongly encourage avoiding such practices due significantly greater risks than any potential benefits though entire method has been described legitimate by some individuals despite seemingly lack circumstantial evidence supports either efficacy or reliability related improvements after application[4].

However if decide continue using them anyways please read instructions carefully , follow all directions especially regarding body position and water precautions! Avoid oversimplifying details written by manufacturer regarding proper procedures risks involved – remember that they are best used only for mild discomfort solutions rather than sole cleaning process!

In Conclusion

In summary Ear Wax Candles are a fascinating alternative therapy yet unfortunately for those who support its promise with medical explanations or research cannot find adequatedefinitive scientific proof proving complete correctness across board . It is important remain wary before undertaking such non FDA approved methods be sure take any other available options into consideration beforehand consulting GP referral specialist opinion first whenever unsure about effectiveness expected outcome !

But hey, who knows maybe this weird and bizarre practice could end up being beneficial one day – just probably not anytime soon…

Sources

  1. Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol September–October 2018 Volume6 Issue5 Pages428-432
  2. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/
  3. BMJ Case Reports 2016; Published in Niceragu and et.al.
  4. American Academy of Otolaryngology- Head Neck Surg (2009): Clinical Practice Guideline: Cerumen Impaction

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