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How do proton pump inhibitors work?

Proton pump inhibitors such as Prilosec (omeprazole) and Nexium (esomeprazole) are among the most widely-prescribed medications on earth. Used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), they are effective and relatively safe when used on a short-term basis (no more than 12 weeks).

What is the most effective proton pump inhibitor? Proton pump inhibitors such as Prilosec (omeprazole) and Nexium (esomeprazole) are among the most widely-prescribed medications on earth. Used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), they are effective and relatively safe when used on a short-term basis (no more than 12 weeks).

Which drugs reaact with proton pump inhibitors? Proton pump inhibitor drug interactions can happen with medicines ranging from aspirin to cancer drugs . People should be aware of how proton pump inhibitors interact with other drugs they take. PPIs alter the pH of the stomach. The pH is a measure of stomach acidity. An altered pH can change the way certain drugs work within the body.

What interactions are possible with proton pump inhibitors? Possible drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) include: Digoxin – PPIs may cause a small rise in serum digoxin levels (although not considered clinically significant). Warfarin – PPIs can occasionally enhance the effects of warfarin. Methotrexate – PPIs possibly reduce excretion of methotrexate, leading to an increased risk of methotrexate toxicity.

How to wean yourself off proton pump inhibitors? Get Off PPIs in 5 Steps: Gradually reduce the dosage by 25%-50% each week until you are taking half your current dosage. Reduce intake frequency. Change to an H2 blocker and wean down from H2 blocker to antacid using the same steps as in 1&2. At this point, occasional heartburn can be treated with antacids and an H2 blocker when necessary.

What are the alternatives to proton pump inhibitors?

What are the alternatives to proton pump inhibitors? Histamine blockers, or H-2 blockers, are medications that can be used as an alternative to proton pump inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcer, states MayoClinic.com. Histamine is a normal substance within your body. When histamine combines with a histamine receptor, acid-secreting cells in the stomach begin to release hydrochloric acid.

How safe are proton pump inhibitors? Proton pump inhibitors are safe. The experimental evidence suggests that proton pump inhibitors are safe to use, at least for a period of three years.

What are the dangers of proton pump inhibitors? Studies have linked proton pump inhibitors to serious, sometimes life-threatening side effects. Higher dosages and long-term use increase the risk for many of those complications. Prolonged use of these medicines can cause kidney disease, injury and failure. It can also lead to heart attacks, cancers and bone fractures.

How to wean yourself off proton pump inhibitors? Get Off PPIs in 5 Steps: Gradually reduce the dosage by 25%-50% each week until you are taking half your current dosage. Reduce intake frequency. Change to an H2 blocker and wean down from H2 blocker to antacid using the same steps as in 1&2. At this point, occasional heartburn can be treated with antacids and an H2 blocker when necessary.