Are hcg drops safe for diabetics?

Let’s talk about hCG drops and diabetes! Are they compatible? Safe? Effective? Follow along as we explore this curious combination.

What are hCG Drops?

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone produced during pregnancy. It helps maintain the production of progesterone, which is essential to carry the pregnancy to term. Fun fact: This hormone can be extracted from urine and used in fertility treatments.

But what about these mysterious “drops” that everyone keeps talking about? Well, they’re usually marketed as weight loss supplements. The idea is that taking small amounts of hCG will trigger your body to release stored fat cells, resulting in fast and effortless weight loss without feeling hungry or deprived.

However, there isn’t much scientific evidence supporting these claims. In fact, multiple studies have shown that hCG does not significantly increase weight loss beyond what you’d expect from simply following a low-calorie diet (1).

So why do people still use them? Some swear by the results and claim it’s the only thing that works for them (2). Others might feel like they’ve wasted their money but continue using them because of a phenomenon called cognitive dissonance—basically, our brains don’t like admitting we made a bad decision so instead we try to rationalize it (3).

What is Diabetes?

Before we can answer whether or not hCG drops work safely with diabetes, let’s take a little detour into understanding diabetes itself!

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an umbrella term for several conditions characterized by high blood sugar levels over an extended period due to your body either not producing enough insulin or becoming resistant to its effects (4).

Type 1 DM typically develops early on in life when your immune system attacks and destroys beta cells in your pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Thus, people with Type 1 DM require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood sugar levels (4).

Type 2 DM is more common and usually occurs in adults due to a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors such as obesity, lack of exercise, and poor diet quality. Although your body still produces insulin, your cells become resistant to its effects, causing glucose (sugar) build-up in the bloodstream (5).

Gestational diabetes can occur during pregnancy when hormonal changes increase insulin resistance (6) but usually resolves after giving birth.

So…Can You Use hCG Drops If You Have Diabetes?

The short answer: it’s complicated!

While there haven’t been any studies specifically examining the interaction between hCG drops and diabetes medication or management strategies, we do know that following a low-calorie diet like the one required for most hCG drop protocols can significantly impact blood sugar control if you’re taking diabetic medications such as sulfonylureas or meglitinides which stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells (7).

Additionally, carbohydrate intake regulation is critical in continuously managing type two diabetes since carbohydrates cause an increase in blood sugar. Finding products that are low carb might seem difficult; however using this foods list on mynetdiary will help you monitor how many carbs you consume each day to maintain proper health

More so Studies have shown conflicting results regarding whether rapid weight loss affects glycemic control or not (8). Some indicate a positive benefit while others suggest it could increase hypoglycemia risk depending on other treatment variables like timing of medication doses or energy expenditure during physical activity.

Before starting any kind of new dietary supplement when having Diabetes make sure always to consult with licensed medical professionals first. They will provide personalized care according to various considerations such as current medications, blood sugar levels, and essential health parameters.

Final Verdict: HCG Drops for Diabetics

Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer! If you’re interested in hCG drops but have diabetes, it’s critical to talk with your doctor first. They’ll know your medical history and any specific needs that must be addressed to ensure safe usage.

It always better consulting professionals than relying online products or supplements tactics alone. Make sure to prioritize the safety of yourself above all else!

That being said, hCG drops themselves aren’t inherently dangerous (9). Still weight management medications such as these should never replace healthy eating habits and consistent physical activity when managing Diabetes.

Remember the specifics surrounding Diabetes is a complex matter taking care of by licensed health care providers; likewise is not advisable for self-diagnosis but rather lining yourselves up with experts regarding complementary therapy options available.

Sources:

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18326991/
  2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/hcg-diet-101
  3. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/science-choice/201504/how-we-rationalize-bad-decisions-after-the-fact#:~:text=Cognitive%20dissonance%E2%80%94the%20mental,past%20behavioralsomehowitwasn’tallthatbad.
  4. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes#type2
    5.https://medlineplus.gov/type-1-diabetes.html
    6 .https://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancy-complications/gestational-diabetes/
    7 .Mudaliar S , Henry RR : Rapid induction of beta-cell rest using nateglinide in type 2 diabetic patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) . Diabetes Technol Ther 2001;3:61–66
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5161560/
    9.https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/hcg-drops-101

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